Research not for publishing papers, but for fun, for satisfying curiosity, and for revealing the truth.

This blog reports latest progresses in
(1) Signal Processing and Machine Learning for Biomedicine, Neuroimaging, Wearable Healthcare, and Smart-Home
(2) Sparse Signal Recovery and Compressed Sensing of Signals by Exploiting Spatiotemporal Structures
(3) My Works


Sunday, January 11, 2015

Wearables, Sensables, and Opportuniteis at CES 2015

ApplySci released a summary on wearable healthcare devices on CES 2015. And I quoted below. ApplySci commented that "Samsung's Simband is best positioned to take wearables into medical monitoring". Note that in Simband, PPG are used to monitor heart rate for fitness tracking and health monitoring, and I've already obtained the superior PPG-based heart rate estimation algorithms for it. Some general frameworks have been published/under review by IEEE Transaction on Biomedical Engineering. You can check my website for more details: https://sites.google.com/site/researchbyzhang/

It was the year of Digital Health and Wearable Tech at CES.  Endless watches tracked vital signs (and many athletes exercised tirelessly to prove the point).   New were several ear based fitness monitors (Brag), and some interesting TENS pain relief wearables (Quell).  Many companies provided  monitoring for senior citizens, and the most interesting only notified caregivers when there was a change in learned behavior (GreenPeak).  Senior companion robots were missing, although robots capable of household tasks were present (Oshbot).  3D printing was big (printed Pizza)–but where were 3d printed bones and organs?  Augmented reality was popular (APX,Augmenta)–but mostly for gaming or industrial use.  AR for health is next.

Two companies continue to stand out in Digital Health.  Samsung’s Simband  is best positioned to take wearables into  medical monitoring, with its multitude of sensors, open platform, and truly advanced health technologies. And  MC10‘s electronics that bend, stretch, and flex will disrupt home diagnosis, remote monitoring, and smart medical devices.

We see two immediate opportunities.  The brain, and the pulse.

1.  A few companies at CES claimed to monitor brain activity, and one savvy brand (Muse) provided earphones with soothing sounds while a headband monitored attention.  While these gadgets were fun to try, noone at CES presented extensive brain state interpretation to address cognitive and emotional issues.

2.  Every athlete at CES used a traditional finger based pulse sensor.  A slick wearable that can forgo the finger piece will make pulse oximetry during sports fun, instead of awkward.  As with every gadget, ensuring accuracy is key, as blind faith in wearables can be dangerous.

ApplySci looks forward to CES 2016, and the many breakthroughs to be discovered along the way, many of which will be featured at Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC 2015.




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